Giving up alcohol may significantly boost mental health

Numerous people fall into the categories of "light" or "moderate" drinkers. But is this habit harmless, or would all of us be better off abstaining from alcohol? Even among researchers, opinions tend to vary greatly as to whether drinking any amount of alcohol is safe or healthful. 

ISLAMABAD (Online): Many people drink socially at, for instance, work functions or family events. Some of us may also relish having a glass of wine or beer with our dinner at the end of a long and tiring day.

Numerous people fall into the categories of “light” or “moderate” drinkers. But is this habit harmless, or would all of us be better off abstaining from alcohol?
Even among researchers, opinions tend to vary greatly as to whether drinking any amount of alcohol is safe or healthful.

For instance, earlier this year, a study published in The Lancet argued that moderate drinking can increase a person’s risk of cardiovascular events.
Meanwhile, research featured this month in the journal Alcoholism: Clinical and Experimental Research suggests that older adults who occasionally drink may live longer than nondrinkers.
There are also issues surrounding the link between alcohol consumption and mental health. While doctors know that overindulging in alcohol can affect mental well-being, it remains unclear whether people who drink moderately would fare better by becoming teetotalers.
Now, a study from the University of Hong Kong (HKU) has found that adults, and women in particular, who completely give up drinking experience a boost in mental well-being. The study’s results appear in theCanadian Medical Association Journal.
“More evidence suggests caution in recommending moderate drinking as part of a healthy diet,” notes study co-author Dr. Michael Ni.
As part of the research, the investigators first analyzed data collected from 10,386 participants via the FAMILY Cohort study at HKU.

All of the participants were either nondrinkers or reported drinking moderately. The group included people who used to drink, people who had recently started drinking, persistent drinkers, formerly persistent drinkers, and lifetime abstainers

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